The Checklist Manifesto

Notes from the book

  • Chapter 1
    • Humans have to deal with information overload
    • Ignorance – not knowing something
    • Ineptitude – inability to apply something correctly. Incompetence hurts more
  • Chapter 2

    • Checklists help
    • When a new type of plane was introduced (B17) even the most experienced pilot made errors. Can be remedied with checklists
    • Gaining experience and mastery is one dimension. Retaining knowledge/being diligent is not same as becoming good.
    • Checklists fill the gap

    Chapter 3

    • Single master expert who tracks and makes decisions on several specialized verticals no longer works
    • Communication and tracking between specialists helps in making decisions as a group.
    • Checklists help in scheduling communication between specialists and also tracking ground up

    Chapter 4

    • Use checklists as a means to validate something has been done right. An example – Van Halen had a lengthy checklist for venues where they would go to perform. Sneak in a trivial but easy to verify item on the checklist (A bowl of M&Ms with no brown candies). If it has been carried out, you gain some confidence. Use it as a measure to determine thoroughness of verification necessary

    Chapter 5

    • Bad checklists don’t work
    • Precise and concise checklists work
    • Short checklists are useless
    • Long checklists result in people taking shortcuts
    • Checklists are not detailed how to guides

    Chapter 6

    • Make checklists for rare situations
      • READ-DO checklists that are recipes to follow
    • Make checklists for regular situations

      • DO-CONFIRM checklists for checkpointing

    Chapter 7

    • Make following checklists non optional (in a non authoritarian way)
    • Checklists need tweaking depending on environment or other factors even if accomplishing the same goal
      • Tailor checklists to target users

    Chapter 8

    • Checklists work across domains
    • Even experts are not spared from mistakes
    • Checklists are additional safety nets to ensure the obvious has not been overlooked
    • Develop the discipline to adhere to good checklists

    Chapter 9

    • Checklists help

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